Forces That Cause Change | Forces & Motion | Physics | FuseSchool

Click here to see more videos: https://alugha.com/FuseSchool So what exactly is a force? A force is just a push or pull in a particular direction. Whenever you push or pull something, you are exerting a force on it. The forces that you exert can cause three things: 1. They can change the shape of an object. 2. They can change the speed of an object. 3. A force can change the direction in which something is traveling. If a force changes both the speed and the direction of an object, then we say its velocity has been changed. This is because velocity is a vector quantity, that measures both the speed and the direction. Changes in shape can mean a variety of things. Objects can be stretched, bent, or compressed. When an object changes shape we say it is deformed. There are two types of deformation: 1. Elastic deformation 2. Plastic deformation In elastic deformation the object returns to its original shape when the force has been removed. In plastic deformation the material does not return to its original shape when the force has been removed. This graph shows a force extension curve for deformation. Objects deform elastically... until they reach their elastic limit - or yield point. When the elastic limit has been exceeded objects deform plastically. You know when you stretch your elastic band, and it pings back to shape. That’s elastic deformation. But when you stretch it too far… and it then doesn’t go back to it’s starting shape. It’s now an overstretched ‘saggy’ elastic band. That’s because we reached it’s elastic limit - or yield point. And the band deforms plastically. And if we stretch it too far it breaks, that’s the rupture point. We can also see the yield point - or elastic limit - in a classroom by applying extra weights to a spring, until the spring doesn’t return to its starting shape. Credits: Design & Animation: Bing Rijper Narration: Dale Bennett Script: Bethan Parry SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: info@fuseschool.org

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Sine Or Cosine Rule? | Trigonometry | Maths | FuseSchool

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