Could eating chocolate get you a Nobel Prize?

Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows an association between the average amount of chocolate each person in country eats, and the number of Nobel Prize winners that country produces. But as the author points out, an association doesn't necessarily mean that eating chocolate makes you smart. And this is where risk comes in - it's easy to believe that an association between a substance and a disease means that the one causes the other. But without more information, it's all too easy to have a "Nobel-Chocolate" moment. For more information, please visit http://riskbites.org/?p=150 Source: Messerli F H (2012) Chocolate Consumption, Cognitive Function, and Nobel Laureates. N Engl J Med 367;16 The original New England Journal of Medicine paper is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMon1211064 - although unfortunately it's behind a paywall. You can read more about the science behind chocolate and health at http://www.mindthesciencegap.org/2012/10/19/for-the-love-of-chocolate/ Click here to see more videos: https://alugha.com/RiskBites 

LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike

More videos by this producer

Just how dangerous is a cup of coffee?

A California judge is requiring cancer warning labels on coffee. So we thought we’d take look at some of the other highly improbable risks associated with your cup of joe. We love a good cup of coffee at Risk Bites. So we were rather dismayed to discover that California judge William le Jeunesse ha

Why don't people take measles more seriously?

How do you decide whether you should be worried about communicable diseases like measles? University of Michigan’s Professor Brian Zikmund-Fisher returns to Risk Bites to explain the "availability heuristic" – the way we all use our memory and feelings to inform our risk perceptions about infectious

What is nanotechnology?

A short introduction to nanotechnology, and why you should care about it. The video dives into materials science and advanced materials, and looks at how designing and engineering substances from the atoms they're made of upward allows novel properties to be developed and used. It also looks at res