Is public engagement on science a bad idea?

Should people who aren't scientists have a say in what science gets done, and how it is used? This week, Risk Bites takes on the knotty topic of science and public engagement. This video was created to preface a conference session on engaging publics on science and technology -- synthetic biology in particular -- at the First Annual Conference on the Governance of Emerging Technologies (http://conferences.asucollegeoflaw.com/emergingtechnologies/), organized by Arizona State University and Co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Risk Science Center (http://riskcenter.org) This week's Risk Bites team: Andrew Maynard (script, audio, illustrations, editing) David Faulkner (post-production) Risk Bites is your guide to making sense of risk. We cover everything from understanding and balancing the risks and benefits of everyday products, to health science more broadly, to the potential impacts of emerging technologies, to making sense of risk perception. If you enjoy our videos, please subscribe, and spread the word! Click here to see more videos: https://alugha.com/RiskBites

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