Shape Shifters: Shape-Memory Alloys and Polymers

In this video excerpt from NOVA’s "Making Stuff: Smarter", host and New York Times technology columnist David Pogue visits Virginia Tech, where scientists are developing an artificial jellyfish that will act as an inconspicuous motion-detecting buoy for the Navy. The jellyfish is propelled by a shape-memory alloy that returns to its original shape after being exposed to heat. In the related demonstration, students discover some other shape-memory materials that can sense and respond to their environments. They also learn how materials scientists are developing new “smart” materials to help solve problems in engineering, medicine, and everyday life. CREDITS: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/credits/nvms.sci.materials.smarterdemo/ LICENSE: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/help/full-license-for-section-3c-of-terms-of-use-download-and-share/

LicenseCustom License

More videos by this producer

NOVA scienceNOW: T. Rex Blood?

In this video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, learn how scientists are hoping to better understand the biology of dinosaurs by studying the insides of fossil bones. Hear about the accidental discovery of dinosaur soft tissue by paleontologist Dr. Mary Schweitzer, and how this tissue enables sc

Black Hole Apocalypse | Modeling Galaxies

Learn how computer modeling indicates that supermassive black holes may exist at the centers of all galaxies in this video from NOVA: Black Hole Apocalypse. Use this resource to stimulate student curiosity about the structure of galaxies and to provide opportunities for students to develop and use m

NOVA scienceNOW: What Will the Future Be Like? | Wearable Robots

Learn about in advances in powered exoskeletons—a kind of wearable robot—in this video adapted from NOVA scienceNOW. Correspondent and New York Times technology columnist David Pogue explores the development of sophisticated robots that can be integrated with the human body. The company Ekso Bionics