Video: “Missed Care: Mental Health Can’t Wait” (English) – :30 Seconds

Your child’s mental health can’t wait. Prior to the COVID-19 public health emergency, as many as 1 in 6 U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 17 had a treatable mental health disorder. Additional stressors, such as lack of routine and virtual learning, created a surge of anxiety and depression in young people. Despite this surge, mental health services declined sharply among children age 18 and under. Although delivery of care via telehealth has helped connect children to important mental health services, data has shown that many children and teens are still not getting the care they need. With Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), children have coverage for mental and behavioral health services necessary to prevent, diagnose, and treat a broad range of mental health symptoms and disorders. Families without health insurance may be eligible for free or low-cost health insurance available through Medicaid or CHIP and they can enroll at any time of the year. Parents may be eligible for Medicaid, too. Visit the “Find Coverage for Your Family” map on InsureKidsNow.gov or call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669) to learn more. We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: https://www.hhs.gov/web/social-media/policies/index.html Additionally, please view the HHS Privacy Policy: https://www.hhs.gov/privacy.html

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Open Enrollment – English

Life’s an adventure, but your health shouldn’t be. Check out open enrollment options November 1 – January 15. Contact your local Indian health care provider for more information, visit Healthcare.gov, or call 1–800–318–2596. A message from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Video: “Vision Health” (English) — :15 seconds

Peace of mind is knowing your child has access to quality vision care. About 1 in 10 preschoolers and 25% of kids in grades K-6 have vision deficiencies. When vision problems go undetected in children, it can lead to impaired development or a misdiagnosed learning disability. Regular comprehensive e