The Effect of Sea Surface Temperature on Hurricanes

This video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW highlights research that supports the idea that warmer oceans generate and sustain more intense hurricanes. Ongoing monitoring of sea surface temperature (SST) has supplied evidence that the world's oceans warmed 0.5°C between 1970 and 2005. Because hurricanes rely on warm water to release heat into the upper atmosphere and create spiraling winds, any additional energy can result in increased intensity. The video examines factors scientists use to predict hurricane behavior, and states that the complex nature of hurricane formation makes predicting with a high degree of accuracy very difficult. This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions. CREDITS: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/credits/clim10.sci.ess.watcyc.seasurftemp/ LICENSE: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/help/full-license-for-section-3c-of-terms-of-use-download-and-share/

LicenseCustom License

More videos by this producer

Mirror Neurons

This video segment, adapted from NOVA scienceNow, introduces the latest research on a system of neurons that plays a part in how people relate to each other. CREDITS: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/credits/hew06.sci.life.reg.mirrorneurons/ LICENSE: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/help/full-lice

NOVA scienceNOW: Franklin Chang-Díaz: Rocket Scientist

In this video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, meet Franklin Chang-Díaz, an astronaut and scientist. Learn how he has been interested in rockets and space travel since he was a child in Costa Rica, and how he immigrated to the United States to pursue his dream of becoming an astronaut. Hear how

The Science Behind Appetite

This video segment, adapted from NOVA, documents a ballerina's experience with a potentially deadly eating disorder: anorexia nervosa. Research suggests that a brain chemical called serotonin plays a prominent role in regulating appetite—a key factor in eating disorders. The disruption of serotonin