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Saturn's Cyclones | NASA Planetary Sciences

Learn about powerful cyclones seen at Saturn's north and south poles in this video from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. From a distance, Saturn appears to be serene; however, the Cassini spacecraft has provided detailed views that show the planet's active atmosphere. A giant cyclone (with a diameter about two Earths wide) was discovered at the south pole in 2006, and scientists were surprised to find a similar cyclone at the north pole in 2008. Cassini scientist Kevin Baines explains how the storms on Saturn are fueled by the planet's internal heat and are the largest and most powerful storms of this type in the solar system. CREDITS: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/credits/npls13.sci.ess.eiu.cyclone/ LICENSE: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/help/full-license-for-section-3c-of-terms-of-use-download-and-share/

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