Saturn's Rings and Moons | NASA Planetary Sciences

Explore the rings and moons of Saturn through images from the Cassini spacecraft. Saturn's rings were discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei, although he did not see enough detail to know what they were. In 2004, the Cassini spacecraft began capturing unprecedented images of Saturn's atmosphere and the complex structure of its rings and moons. It is hypothesized that the rings formed when Saturn swallowed one of its moons. The many moons of Saturn interact with the ring particles, shaping and clearing lanes in the rings. Saturn has dozens of moons with varying characteristics, but Titan and Enceladus are the most thoroughly studied. CREDITS: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/credits/npls12.sci.ess.eiu.saturn/ License: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/help/full-license-for-section-3c-of-terms-of-use-download-and-share/

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