Denver McKee - Bonanza S2|38

Ranchers are being killed, cattle stolen, and retired U.S. Deputy Marshall Denver McKee leads various posses after the suspects but never seems to be able to find them. In the meantime, McKee seems to have plenty of money to take care of his gorgeous daughter back home from schooling in the East. Adam, Hoss and Joe are on the trail back to the Ponderosa and are talking about a gal that Joe had picked up in town, when they hear a gunshot. They find an old man who was robbed of three years work and shot, but he couldn't identify the robbers very well. Hoss promises to get him a doctor, but before they even leave to call for one, he is dead. Ben comes to visit Denver, an old friend, and Miles the foreman is by the buggy hooking up the horse. It seems that Denver's daughter, Connie, is coming in from the East and Denver is extremely nervous. He is all dressed up and wants to make a good impression and has got the house fixed up, but is worried that she won't like her new surroundings. Ben asks Denver and Connie to a welcome home party. Denver agrees happily. More on https://bonanza.fandom.com/wiki/Denver_McKee_(episode)

LicensePublic Domain

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