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David Lang: My underwater robot

David Lang is a maker who taught himself to become an amateur oceanographer -- or, he taught a robot to be one for him. In a charming talk Lang, a TED Fellow, shows how he and a network of ocean lovers teamed up to build open-sourced, low-cost underwater explorers.nnTEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.nFind closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translatennFollow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednewsnLike TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TEDnnSubscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

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